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insensible
05-05-2006, 07:12 AM
Training for the marathon should be a 14-day cycle which avoids boredom:

Day 1 - Build up to running for 2½ hours, speed is irrelevant, time on the feet is the main point of this session.

Day 2 – Recovery run of 35 minutes.

Day 3 - Variable pace session on the track totalling 10km.

Day 4 - Recovery run of 35 minutes.

Day 5 - Build up to running 18 miles at target marathon speed.

Day 6 - rest.

Day 7 - 10km pace session. Either 6 x 1 mile or 3 x 2 miles with 45 and 90 secs recovery respectively at best 10km speed or faster.

Day 8 - Recovery run of 35 minutes.

Day 9 - Repeat Day 1.

Day 10 - Recovery run 35 minutes.

Day 11 - Repeat Day 5.

Day 12 - Recovery run of 35 minutes.

Day 13 - 5km pace session. Either 8 x 800 or 6 x 1 km at best 5km speed or faster with 45 and 60secs rest respectively.

Day 14 - Rest.

The maximum mileage involved, excluding warm up runs, is around 64 miles a week.

For 48 hours before the race, do no training at all, but a 15 minute jog on both days is OK. Consume low glycemic carbs up to 600g daily. For the final 24 hours before the race increase water intake by 1 pint an hour but stop 30 minutes before the start. Costill found that before the Boston marathon, many marathoners had miniscule muscle cell damage, which was worse after the race. The 35-minute recovery runs will prevent this in your training cycle.

During the race, concentrate on reaching the first mile and 10km bang on time. A marathon should be apportioned 51 per cent of the target time for the first half and 49 per cent for the second. For example if your target is 7mins/mile, reach the 15 miles mark in 1:34:00, the next 13 miles will be in 1:29:30secs. If you reverse this scheduling, be prepared to "die" in the last mile!

RunningJim
05-05-2006, 08:46 AM
So you only need to train for 14 days for a marathon? I thought it took longer than that.

Maverick
05-05-2006, 08:51 AM
So you only need to train for 14 days for a marathon? I thought it took longer than that.

Ditto but i'm also trying to run the twin cities marathon in 2011

CoachLevi
05-17-2006, 09:29 AM
I thought it took longer than that.

It does. :cool:

If you're just starting out, don't even think of doing 64 miles per week. Start at around 20 or even less depending on your condition.

And it should take a while before building up to a 2.5 hour run.

I think there's a book called "4 months to your perfect marathon" or something like that. 4 months is about the minimum time before the race that you should be training!

moor2k6
05-24-2006, 02:17 PM
As a runner I'm sure you are all too familiar with those rare days that you run and feel like your feet are barely touching the ground, like you are hardly breathing, and like you could absolutely run forever. (I wish I had the formula for how to feel that way more often!)

My question is: If I am experiencing one of these types of days (the "euphoric run") on a day that I am scheduled to run - say - a Wednesday 10 miler, but have the energy and drive to continue running the distance of my long run -- say a Saturday 16 miler -- is there any consequence to "swapping" those two days out?

Suggestions, thoughts, information.....thanks!

CoachLevi
05-30-2006, 12:43 PM
My question is: If I am experiencing one of these types of days (the "euphoric run") on a day that I am scheduled to run - say - a Wednesday 10 miler, but have the energy and drive to continue running the distance of my long run -- say a Saturday 16 miler -- is there any consequence to "swapping" those two days out?

Suggestions, thoughts, information.....thanks!

Do it.

If you feel good, do lots. If you feel sick, take an easy day.

Rudy
05-30-2006, 08:56 PM
Do it.

If you feel good, do lots. If you feel sick, take an easy day.

I totally agree. It is very important to listen to your body. Also, it was mentioned earlier about training time for a marathon. Absolutely no one could start training fresh 14 days before a marathon. That's crazy.

As has been said, you need to train for about 4 months (a 16 week schedule is the most ideal).

Start low, and slowly increase. It takes a lot of patience, endurance, and wisdom to properly train for a marathon. Again: Listen to your body - if you feel sick or injured - don't push yourself.

moor2k6
06-07-2006, 12:35 AM
IS WIEGHT TRAINING ESSENTIAL FOR A MARATHON RUNNER
Incorporating weight training (also referred to as strength training and resistance training) into one's overall fitness program can provide many benefits to a runner training for events ranging from the sprints to the marathon. , the benefits of total body conditioning through a weight-training program will be highlighted.