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ravs2k6
05-13-2006, 12:54 PM
Drinking while running definitely is not easy. Unless you grasp the cup carefully, you can spill half the contents on the ground. If you gulp too quickly, you can spend the next mile coughing and gasping. If you dawdle at aid stations, you can waste precious seconds. And if you gulp down a replacement drink you aren't used to, it might make you nauseous.
Drinking on the run is a science--and so you need to practice. Do this during your training runs, particularly your long training runs.

CoachLevi
05-17-2006, 09:04 AM
If you are running a half or full marathon, it can be a good part of your strategy to walk through the aid stations.

It gives you a quick rest and allows you to drink properly. Unless you're shooting for a sub 3 hour marathon, walking sometimes will give you a faster overall time.

moor2k6
05-22-2006, 11:14 PM
At the moment, I don't have a problem carrying with me all the water I need for my very short runs. But in the future, when I start to get more fit and can run longer distances, how will I carry with me the amount of water I need for adequate hydration? I've seen those back pack things, and they honestly look cumbersome and useless, but my wast pack can only hold a 16-20 oz. container of fluid. Also, what exactly is adequate hydration? How much water should I be drinking for each mile?
Suggestions needed

moor2k6
05-24-2006, 12:37 PM
Basically you always want to take in more fluid than what you've lost in sweat. So going into your event well hydrated is important. Dehydration can cause up to 30% performance loss so it's a serious matter. But for some runners like others lose less sweat than others which entitles you to less fluids.
Also you were saying that you carry water with you on your runs, long runs of up to 4 hours or more and drinking only water may give you hyponatremia which is serious low blood sodium level in the body and is very dangerous. Thats why some of those isotonic drinks (ie.Gatorade) are important they are packed with electrolytes and additionally contain carbs, but if water still bring some gels to slurp along on your fanny pack. And if your the type of person who sweats a lot then it's logical to have more fluid intake